7 Cool Facts about Bearded Dragons | Pet Reptiles

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Learn seven cool facts about bearded dragons from reptile and amphibian expert Jungle Bob in this Howcast video.

When we think of the continent of Australia, we think of unusual animals right away, from kangaroos to platypuses to wallabies. They’re all over there in Australia, it seems. But there are some that are not that unusual, just fantastic creatures. And one of them is the Pogona Vitticeps, the Bearded Dragon. There’s a number of different species in Australia, but the popular one is the dragon you see in front of you here, that has dominated the pet world now for the last 20 to 25 years.

In their native Australia, they’re inquisitive creatures that easily inhabit areas where people are. They like to climb fence posts and look out to see what’s going on. Males will dominate a territory and have multiple females as mates. And they’re prolific breeders. They have up to 20 eggs at a time and they dominate the landscape they come from.

They’re quick when they have to be to escape predators. They’re extremely fast runners. For the most part, they’re kind of sit there and look out and see what’s going on animals in the wild. They’re very fun and animated to watch.

They’ll eat a variety of things from insects to greens to small pieces of meat, such as rodents. Bearded Dragons are largely protected now in their native Australia. They’re no longer exported, which is very good. Thank you, Australia, for allowing us to have some of them. But because of their prolific nature, they are no longer hunted there and they’re free to multiply and grow in Australia without any danger of being threatened by the pet trade or by confiscation.

The Bearded Dragon gets his name, as you can see, the big male here is going to get a little territorial. First he gets up on his front limbs. And if he gets really agitated with the smaller one in front of him, he’ll do two things. First, he’ll start bobbing his head up and down to say, “I’m the biggest dragon in this area, so back off.” And if that doesn’t work, he actually throws out his throat. It turns black and he puffs it out. It looks like a big black beard. And that’s where the animal gets his name.

The Bearded Dragon will do that every time an animal is reintroduced into its area. If he wants to threaten it, he will throw that beard out. Sometimes in captivity they don’t bother doing it anymore because they’re so docile by nature and he knows this other dragon, so he’s not really doing it at this moment.

But two males together, one will dominate the other. He’ll say, “I’m the biggest dragon here.” If the other one is of equal size and equal temperament, they will fight. If not, the smaller one actually submits. And what they do is take their arm and they move it ever so slowly in a counter clockwise direction and the larger dragon will understand that that’s like a person saying, “Don’t hit me.” He puts his hands up and says, “I don’t want to fight.”

So, they work things out together in nature. In nature, of course, they can disappear and run in different areas. In a captive environment, they have to have that submissive language going back and forth between them in order to avoid fights in captivity. The Bearded Dragon, an Australian treasure for sure.

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Published on Aug 13, 2013
Watch more How to Take Care of Reptiles & Amphibians videos:
http://www.howcast.com/videos/512378-

Learn seven cool facts about bearded dragons from reptile and amphibian
expert Jungle Bob in this Howcast video.

When we think of the continent of Australia, we think of unusual animals
right away, from kangaroos to platypuses to wallabies. They’re all over
there in Australia, it seems. But there are some that are not that unusual,
just fantastic creatures. And one of them is the Pogona Vitticeps, the
Bearded Dragon. There’s a number of different species in Australia, but the
popular one is the dragon you see in front of you here, that has dominated
the pet world now for the last 20 to 25 years.

In their native Australia, they’re inquisitive creatures that easily
inhabit areas where people are. They like to climb fence posts and look out
to see what’s going on. Males will dominate a territory and have multiple
females as mates. And they’re prolific breeders. They have up to 20 eggs at
a time and they dominate the landscape they come from.

They’re quick when they have to be to escape predators. They’re extremely
fast runners. For the most part, they’re kind of sit there and look out and
see what’s going on animals in the wild. They’re very fun and animated to
watch.

They’ll eat a variety of things from insects to greens to small pieces of
meat, such as rodents. Bearded Dragons are largely protected now in their
native Australia. They’re no longer exported, which is very good. Thank
you, Australia, for allowing us to have some of them. But because of their
prolific nature, they are no longer hunted there and they’re free to
multiply and grow in Australia without any danger of being threatened by
the pet trade or by confiscation.

The Bearded Dragon gets his name, as you can see, the big male here is
going to get a little territorial. First he gets up on his front limbs. And
if he gets really agitated with the smaller one in front of him, he’ll do
two things. First, he’ll start bobbing his head up and down to say, “I’m
the biggest dragon in this area, so back off.” And if that doesn’t work, he
actually throws out his throat. It turns black and he puffs it out. It
looks like a big black beard. And that’s where the animal gets his name.

The Bearded Dragon will do that every time an animal is reintroduced into
its area. If he wants to threaten it, he will throw that beard out.
Sometimes in captivity they don’t bother doing it anymore because they’re
so docile by nature and he knows this other dragon, so he’s not really
doing it at this moment.

But two males together, one will dominate the other. He’ll say, “I’m the
biggest dragon here.” If the other one is of equal size and equal
temperament, they will fight. If not, the smaller one actually submits. And
what they do is take their arm and they move it ever so slowly in a counter
clockwise direction and the larger dragon will understand that that’s like
a person saying, “Don’t hit me.” He puts his hands up and says, “I don’t
want to fight.”

So, they work things out together in nature. In nature, of course, they can
disappear and run in different areas. In a captive environment, they have
to have that submissive language going back and forth between them in order
to avoid fights in captivity. The Bearded Dragon, an Australian treasure
for sure.
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Language: English Country: Worldwide Safety: Off History Help
About Press Copyright Creators Advertise Developers +YouTube
Terms Privacy Policy & Safety Send feedback Try something new!
Up Next 7 Cool Facts about Bearded Dragons | Pet Reptiles
Howcast
Subscribe3,011,382
Add to
Share
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347,107
1,479 38
Published on Aug 13, 2013
Watch more How to Take Care of Reptiles & Amphibians videos:
http://www.howcast.com/videos/512378-

Learn seven cool facts about bearded dragons from reptile and amphibian
expert Jungle Bob in this Howcast video.

When we think of the continent of Australia, we think of unusual animals
right away, from kangaroos to platypuses to wallabies. They’re all over
there in Australia, it seems. But there are some that are not that unusual,
just fantastic creatures. And one of them is the Pogona Vitticeps, the
Bearded Dragon. There’s a number of different species in Australia, but the
popular one is the dragon you see in front of you here, that has dominated
the pet world now for the last 20 to 25 years.

In their native Australia, they’re inquisitive creatures that easily
inhabit areas where people are. They like to climb fence posts and look out
to see what’s going on. Males will dominate a territory and have multiple
females as mates. And they’re prolific breeders. They have up to 20 eggs at
a time and they dominate the landscape they come from.

They’re quick when they have to be to escape predators. They’re extremely
fast runners. For the most part, they’re kind of sit there and look out and
see what’s going on animals in the wild. They’re very fun and animated to
watch.

They’ll eat a variety of things from insects to greens to small pieces of
meat, such as rodents. Bearded Dragons are largely protected now in their
native Australia. They’re no longer exported, which is very good. Thank
you, Australia, for allowing us to have some of them. But because of their
prolific nature, they are no longer hunted there and they’re free to
multiply and grow in Australia without any danger of being threatened by
the pet trade or by confiscation.

The Bearded Dragon gets his name, as you can see, the big male here is
going to get a little territorial. First he gets up on his front limbs. And
if he gets really agitated with the smaller one in front of him, he’ll do
two things. First, he’ll start bobbing his head up and down to say, “I’m
the biggest dragon in this area, so back off.” And if that doesn’t work, he
actually throws out his throat. It turns black and he puffs it out. It
looks like a big black beard. And that’s where the animal gets his name.

The Bearded Dragon will do that every time an animal is reintroduced into
its area. If he wants to threaten it, he will throw that beard out.
Sometimes in captivity they don’t bother doing it anymore because they’re
so docile by nature and he knows this other dragon, so he’s not really
doing it at this moment.

But two males together, one will dominate the other. He’ll say, “I’m the
biggest dragon here.” If the other one is of equal size and equal
temperament, they will fight. If not, the smaller one actually submits. And
what they do is take their arm and they move it ever so slowly in a counter
clockwise direction and the larger dragon will understand that that’s like
a person saying, “Don’t hit me.” He puts his hands up and says, “I don’t
want to fight.”

So, they work things out together in nature. In nature, of course, they can
disappear and run in different areas. In a captive environment, they have
to have that submissive language going back and forth between them in order
to avoid fights in captivity. The Bearded Dragon, an Australian treasure
for sure.
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About Press Copyright Creators Advertise Developers +YouTube
Terms Privacy Policy & Safety Send feedback Try something new!
Up Next 7 Cool Facts about Bearded Dragons | Pet Reptiles
Howcast
Subscribe3,011,382
Add to
Share
More
347,107
1,479 38
Published on Aug 13, 2013
Watch more How to Take Care of Reptiles & Amphibians videos:
http://www.howcast.com/videos/512378-

Learn seven cool facts about bearded dragons from reptile and amphibian
expert Jungle Bob in this Howcast video.

When we think of the continent of Australia, we think of unusual animals
right away, from kangaroos to platypuses to wallabies. They’re all over
there in Australia, it seems. But there are some that are not that unusual,
just fantastic creatures. And one of them is the Pogona Vitticeps, the
Bearded Dragon. There’s a number of different species in Australia, but the
popular one is the dragon you see in front of you here, that has dominated
the pet world now for the last 20 to 25 years.

In their native Australia, they’re inquisitive creatures that easily
inhabit areas where people are. They like to climb fence posts and look out
to see what’s going on. Males will dominate a territory and have multiple
females as mates. And they’re prolific breeders. They have up to 20 eggs at
a time and they dominate the landscape they come from.

They’re quick when they have to be to escape predators. They’re extremely
fast runners. For the most part, they’re kind of sit there and look out and
see what’s going on animals in the wild. They’re very fun and animated to
watch.

They’ll eat a variety of things from insects to greens to small pieces of
meat, such as rodents. Bearded Dragons are largely protected now in their
native Australia. They’re no longer exported, which is very good. Thank
you, Australia, for allowing us to have some of them. But because of their
prolific nature, they are no longer hunted there and they’re free to
multiply and grow in Australia without any danger of being threatened by
the pet trade or by confiscation.

The Bearded Dragon gets his name, as you can see, the big male here is
going to get a little territorial. First he gets up on his front limbs. And
if he gets really agitated with the smaller one in front of him, he’ll do
two things. First, he’ll start bobbing his head up and down to say, “I’m
the biggest dragon in this area, so back off.” And if that doesn’t work, he
actually throws out his throat. It turns black and he puffs it out. It
looks like a big black beard. And that’s where the animal gets his name.

The Bearded Dragon will do that every time an animal is reintroduced into
its area. If he wants to threaten it, he will throw that beard out.
Sometimes in captivity they don’t bother doing it anymore because they’re
so docile by nature and he knows this other dragon, so he’s not really
doing it at this moment.

But two males together, one will dominate the other. He’ll say, “I’m the
biggest dragon here.” If the other one is of equal size and equal
temperament, they will fight. If not, the smaller one actually submits. And
what they do is take their arm and they move it ever so slowly in a counter
clockwise direction and the larger dragon will understand that that’s like
a person saying, “Don’t hit me.” He puts his hands up and says, “I don’t
want to fight.”

So, they work things out together in nature. In nature, of course, they can
disappear and run in different areas. In a captive environment, they have
to have that submissive language going back and forth between them in order
to avoid fights in captivity. The Bearded Dragon, an Australian treasure
for sure.
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Language: English Country: Worldwide Safety: Off History Help
About Press Copyright Creators Advertise Developers +YouTube
Terms Privacy Policy & Safety Send feedback Try something new!
Up Next 7 Cool Facts about Bearded Dragons | Pet Reptiles
Howcast
Subscribe3,011,382
Add to
Share
More
347,107
1,479 38
Published on Aug 13, 2013
Watch more How to Take Care of Reptiles & Amphibians videos:
http://www.howcast.com/videos/512378-

Learn seven cool facts about bearded dragons from reptile and amphibian
expert Jungle Bob in this Howcast video.

When we think of the continent of Australia, we think of unusual animals
right away, from kangaroos to platypuses to wallabies. They’re all over
there in Australia, it seems. But there are some that are not that unusual,
just fantastic creatures. And one of them is the Pogona Vitticeps, the
Bearded Dragon. There’s a number of different species in Australia, but the
popular one is the dragon you see in front of you here, that has dominated
the pet world now for the last 20 to 25 years.

In their native Australia, they’re inquisitive creatures that easily
inhabit areas where people are. They like to climb fence posts and look out
to see what’s going on. Males will dominate a territory and have multiple
females as mates. And they’re prolific breeders. They have up to 20 eggs at
a time and they dominate the landscape they come from.

They’re quick when they have to be to escape predators. They’re extremely
fast runners. For the most part, they’re kind of sit there and look out and
see what’s going on animals in the wild. They’re very fun and animated to
watch.

They’ll eat a variety of things from insects to greens to small pieces of
meat, such as rodents. Bearded Dragons are largely protected now in their
native Australia. They’re no longer exported, which is very good. Thank
you, Australia, for allowing us to have some of them. But because of their
prolific nature, they are no longer hunted there and they’re free to
multiply and grow in Australia without any danger of being threatened by
the pet trade or by confiscation.

The Bearded Dragon gets his name, as you can see, the big male here is
going to get a little territorial. First he gets up on his front limbs. And
if he gets really agitated with the smaller one in front of him, he’ll do
two things. First, he’ll start bobbing his head up and down to say, “I’m
the biggest dragon in this area, so back off.” And if that doesn’t work, he
actually throws out his throat. It turns black and he puffs it out. It
looks like a big black beard. And that’s where the animal gets his name.

The Bearded Dragon will do that every time an animal is reintroduced into
its area. If he wants to threaten it, he will throw that beard out.
Sometimes in captivity they don’t bother doing it anymore because they’re
so docile by nature and he knows this other dragon, so he’s not really
doing it at this moment.

But two males together, one will dominate the other. He’ll say, “I’m the
biggest dragon here.” If the other one is of equal size and equal
temperament, they will fight. If not, the smaller one actually submits. And
what they do is take their arm and they move it ever so slowly in a counter
clockwise direction and the larger dragon will understand that that’s like
a person saying, “Don’t hit me.” He puts his hands up and says, “I don’t
want to fight.”

So, they work things out together in nature. In nature, of course, they can
disappear and run in different areas. In a captive environment, they have
to have that submissive language going back and forth between them in order
to avoid fights in captivity. The Bearded Dragon, an Australian treasure
for sure.
SHOW MORE
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1:13:02 SHOW MORE
Language: English Country: Worldwide Safety: Off History Help
About Press Copyright Creators Advertise Developers +YouTube
Terms Privacy Policy & Safety Send feedback Try something new!
Up Next 7 Cool Facts about Bearded Dragons | Pet Reptiles
Howcast
Subscribe3,011,382
Add to
Share
More
347,107
1,479 38
Published on Aug 13, 2013
Watch more How to Take Care of Reptiles & Amphibians videos:
http://www.howcast.com/videos/512378-

Learn seven cool facts about bearded dragons from reptile and amphibian
expert Jungle Bob in this Howcast video.

When we think of the continent of Australia, we think of unusual animals
right away, from kangaroos to platypuses to wallabies. They’re all over
there in Australia, it seems. But there are some that are not that unusual,
just fantastic creatures. And one of them is the Pogona Vitticeps, the
Bearded Dragon. There’s a number of different species in Australia, but the
popular one is the dragon you see in front of you here, that has dominated
the pet world now for the last 20 to 25 years.

In their native Australia, they’re inquisitive creatures that easily
inhabit areas where people are. They like to climb fence posts and look out
to see what’s going on. Males will dominate a territory and have multiple
females as mates. And they’re prolific breeders. They have up to 20 eggs at
a time and they dominate the landscape they come from.

They’re quick when they have to be to escape predators. They’re extremely
fast runners. For the most part, they’re kind of sit there and look out and
see what’s going on animals in the wild. They’re very fun and animated to
watch.

They’ll eat a variety of things from insects to greens to small pieces of
meat, such as rodents. Bearded Dragons are largely protected now in their
native Australia. They’re no longer exported, which is very good. Thank
you, Australia, for allowing us to have some of them. But because of their
prolific nature, they are no longer hunted there and they’re free to
multiply and grow in Australia without any danger of being threatened by
the pet trade or by confiscation.

The Bearded Dragon gets his name, as you can see, the big male here is
going to get a little territorial. First he gets up on his front limbs. And
if he gets really agitated with the smaller one in front of him, he’ll do
two things. First, he’ll start bobbing his head up and down to say, “I’m
the biggest dragon in this area, so back off.” And if that doesn’t work, he
actually throws out his throat. It turns black and he puffs it out. It
looks like a big black beard. And that’s where the animal gets his name.

The Bearded Dragon will do that every time an animal is reintroduced into
its area. If he wants to threaten it, he will throw that beard out.
Sometimes in captivity they don’t bother doing it anymore because they’re
so docile by nature and he knows this other dragon, so he’s not really
doing it at this moment.

But two males together, one will dominate the other. He’ll say, “I’m the
biggest dragon here.” If the other one is of equal size and equal
temperament, they will fight. If not, the smaller one actually submits. And
what they do is take their arm and they move it ever so slowly in a counter
clockwise direction and the larger dragon will understand that that’s like
a person saying, “Don’t hit me.” He puts his hands up and says, “I don’t
want to fight.”

So, they work things out together in nature. In nature, of course, they can
disappear and run in different areas. In a captive environment, they have
to have that submissive language going back and forth between them in order
to avoid fights in captivity. The Bearded Dragon, an Australian treasure
for sure.
SHOW MORE
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Language: English Country: Worldwide Safety: Off History Help
About Press Copyright Creators Advertise Developers +YouTube
Terms Privacy Policy & Safety Send feedback Try something new!
Up Next 7 Cool Facts about Bearded Dragons | Pet Reptiles
Howcast
Subscribe3,011,382
Add to
Share
More
347,107
1,479 38
Published on Aug 13, 2013
Watch more How to Take Care of Reptiles & Amphibians videos:
http://www.howcast.com/videos/512378-

Learn seven cool facts about bearded dragons from reptile and amphibian
expert Jungle Bob in this Howcast video.

When we think of the continent of Australia, we think of unusual animals
right away, from kangaroos to platypuses to wallabies. They’re all over
there in Australia, it seems. But there are some that are not that unusual,
just fantastic creatures. And one of them is the Pogona Vitticeps, the
Bearded Dragon. There’s a number of different species in Australia, but the
popular one is the dragon you see in front of you here, that has dominated
the pet world now for the last 20 to 25 years.

In their native Australia, they’re inquisitive creatures that easily
inhabit areas where people are. They like to climb fence posts and look out
to see what’s going on. Males will dominate a territory and have multiple
females as mates. And they’re prolific breeders. They have up to 20 eggs at
a time and they dominate the landscape they come from.

They’re quick when they have to be to escape predators. They’re extremely
fast runners. For the most part, they’re kind of sit there and look out and
see what’s going on animals in the wild. They’re very fun and animated to
watch.

They’ll eat a variety of things from insects to greens to small pieces of
meat, such as rodents. Bearded Dragons are largely protected now in their
native Australia. They’re no longer exported, which is very good. Thank
you, Australia, for allowing us to have some of them. But because of their
prolific nature, they are no longer hunted there and they’re free to
multiply and grow in Australia without any danger of being threatened by
the pet trade or by confiscation.

The Bearded Dragon gets his name, as you can see, the big male here is
going to get a little territorial. First he gets up on his front limbs. And
if he gets really agitated with the smaller one in front of him, he’ll do
two things. First, he’ll start bobbing his head up and down to say, “I’m
the biggest dragon in this area, so back off.” And if that doesn’t work, he
actually throws out his throat. It turns black and he puffs it out. It
looks like a big black beard. And that’s where the animal gets his name.

The Bearded Dragon will do that every time an animal is reintroduced into
its area. If he wants to threaten it, he will throw that beard out.
Sometimes in captivity they don’t bother doing it anymore because they’re
so docile by nature and he knows this other dragon, so he’s not really
doing it at this moment.

But two males together, one will dominate the other. He’ll say, “I’m the
biggest dragon here.” If the other one is of equal size and equal
temperament, they will fight. If not, the smaller one actually submits. And
what they do is take their arm and they move it ever so slowly in a counter
clockwise direction and the larger dragon will understand that that’s like
a person saying, “Don’t hit me.” He puts his hands up and says, “I don’t
want to fight.”

So, they work things out together in nature. In nature, of course, they can
disappear and run in different areas. In a captive environment, they have
to have that submissive language going back and forth between them in order
to avoid fights in captivity. The Bearded Dragon, an Australian treasure
for sure.
SHOW MORE
Loading…
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by rapatator
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Language: English Country: Worldwide Safety: Off History Help
About Press Copyright Creators Advertise Developers +YouTube
Terms Privacy Policy & Safety Send feedback Try something new!
Up Next 7 Cool Facts about Bearded Dragons | Pet Reptiles

Luke Needham says:

Howcast
Subscribe3,011,382
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347,107
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Published on Aug 13, 2013
Watch more How to Take Care of Reptiles & Amphibians videos:
http://www.howcast.com/videos/512378-

Learn seven cool facts about bearded dragons from reptile and amphibian
expert Jungle Bob in this Howcast video.

When we think of the continent of Australia, we think of unusual animals
right away, from kangaroos to platypuses to wallabies. They’re all over
there in Australia, it seems. But there are some that are not that unusual,
just fantastic creatures. And one of them is the Pogona Vitticeps, the
Bearded Dragon. There’s a number of different species in Australia, but the
popular one is the dragon you see in front of you here, that has dominated
the pet world now for the last 20 to 25 years.

In their native Australia, they’re inquisitive creatures that easily
inhabit areas where people are. They like to climb fence posts and look out
to see what’s going on. Males will dominate a territory and have multiple
females as mates. And they’re prolific breeders. They have up to 20 eggs at
a time and they dominate the landscape they come from.

They’re quick when they have to be to escape predators. They’re extremely
fast runners. For the most part, they’re kind of sit there and look out and
see what’s going on animals in the wild. They’re very fun and animated to
watch.

They’ll eat a variety of things from insects to greens to small pieces of
meat, such as rodents. Bearded Dragons are largely protected now in their
native Australia. They’re no longer exported, which is very good. Thank
you, Australia, for allowing us to have some of them. But because of their
prolific nature, they are no longer hunted there and they’re free to
multiply and grow in Australia without any danger of being threatened by
the pet trade or by confiscation.

The Bearded Dragon gets his name, as you can see, the big male here is
going to get a little territorial. First he gets up on his front limbs. And
if he gets really agitated with the smaller one in front of him, he’ll do
two things. First, he’ll start bobbing his head up and down to say, “I’m
the biggest dragon in this area, so back off.” And if that doesn’t work, he
actually throws out his throat. It turns black and he puffs it out. It
looks like a big black beard. And that’s where the animal gets his name.

The Bearded Dragon will do that every time an animal is reintroduced into
its area. If he wants to threaten it, he will throw that beard out.
Sometimes in captivity they don’t bother doing it anymore because they’re
so docile by nature and he knows this other dragon, so he’s not really
doing it at this moment.

But two males together, one will dominate the other. He’ll say, “I’m the
biggest dragon here.” If the other one is of equal size and equal
temperament, they will fight. If not, the smaller one actually submits. And
what they do is take their arm and they move it ever so slowly in a counter
clockwise direction and the larger dragon will understand that that’s like
a person saying, “Don’t hit me.” He puts his hands up and says, “I don’t
want to fight.”

So, they work things out together in nature. In nature, of course, they can
disappear and run in different areas. In a captive environment, they have
to have that submissive language going back and forth between them in order
to avoid fights in captivity. The Bearded Dragon, an Australian treasure
for sure.
SHOW MORE
Loading…
Autoplay
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by orlandovacationstore
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by rapatator
161,201 views

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Is A Bearded Dragon Right for You? | A Guide to Cost, Supplies, Set-Up,
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by delfiend
82,808 views

1:13:02 SHOW MORE
Language: English Country: Worldwide Safety: Off History Help
About Press Copyright Creators Advertise Developers +YouTube
Terms Privacy Policy & Safety Send feedback Try something new!
Up Next 7 Cool Facts about Bearded Dragons | Pet Reptiles
Howcast
Subscribe3,011,382
Add to
Share
More
347,107
1,479 38
Published on Aug 13, 2013
Watch more How to Take Care of Reptiles & Amphibians videos:
http://www.howcast.com/videos/512378-

Learn seven cool facts about bearded dragons from reptile and amphibian
expert Jungle Bob in this Howcast video.

When we think of the continent of Australia, we think of unusual animals
right away, from kangaroos to platypuses to wallabies. They’re all over
there in Australia, it seems. But there are some that are not that unusual,
just fantastic creatures. And one of them is the Pogona Vitticeps, the
Bearded Dragon. There’s a number of different species in Australia, but the
popular one is the dragon you see in front of you here, that has dominated
the pet world now for the last 20 to 25 years.

In their native Australia, they’re inquisitive creatures that easily
inhabit areas where people are. They like to climb fence posts and look out
to see what’s going on. Males will dominate a territory and have multiple
females as mates. And they’re prolific breeders. They have up to 20 eggs at
a time and they dominate the landscape they come from.

They’re quick when they have to be to escape predators. They’re extremely
fast runners. For the most part, they’re kind of sit there and look out and
see what’s going on animals in the wild. They’re very fun and animated to
watch.

They’ll eat a variety of things from insects to greens to small pieces of
meat, such as rodents. Bearded Dragons are largely protected now in their
native Australia. They’re no longer exported, which is very good. Thank
you, Australia, for allowing us to have some of them. But because of their
prolific nature, they are no longer hunted there and they’re free to
multiply and grow in Australia without any danger of being threatened by
the pet trade or by confiscation.

The Bearded Dragon gets his name, as you can see, the big male here is
going to get a little territorial. First he gets up on his front limbs. And
if he gets really agitated with the smaller one in front of him, he’ll do
two things. First, he’ll start bobbing his head up and down to say, “I’m
the biggest dragon in this area, so back off.” And if that doesn’t work, he
actually throws out his throat. It turns black and he puffs it out. It
looks like a big black beard. And that’s where the animal gets his name.

The Bearded Dragon will do that every time an animal is reintroduced into
its area. If he wants to threaten it, he will throw that beard out.
Sometimes in captivity they don’t bother doing it anymore because they’re
so docile by nature and he knows this other dragon, so he’s not really
doing it at this moment.

But two males together, one will dominate the other. He’ll say, “I’m the
biggest dragon here.” If the other one is of equal size and equal
temperament, they will fight. If not, the smaller one actually submits. And
what they do is take their arm and they move it ever so slowly in a counter
clockwise direction and the larger dragon will understand that that’s like
a person saying, “Don’t hit me.” He puts his hands up and says, “I don’t
want to fight.”

So, they work things out together in nature. In nature, of course, they can
disappear and run in different areas. In a captive environment, they have
to have that submissive language going back and forth between them in order
to avoid fights in captivity. The Bearded Dragon, an Australian treasure
for sure.
SHOW MORE
Loading…
Autoplay
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by Ashley
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by CasaDeOrtiz Dragons
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by kaldaka87
173,973 views

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Happy Bearded Dragon Being Silly
by orlandovacationstore
57,809 views

2:14

52
VIDEOS
How to Take Care of Reptiles & Amphibians
by Howcast
Bearded Dragon Brightens Up Before Your Eyes
by rapatator
161,201 views

5:52
Setting up an Enclosure for Bearded Dragons
by Zamzows Superstore
179,684 views

4:04
Is A Bearded Dragon Right for You? | A Guide to Cost, Supplies, Set-Up,
Care, and Rewards
by delfiend
82,808 views

1:13:02 SHOW MORE
Language: English Country: Worldwide Safety: Off History Help
About Press Copyright Creators Advertise Developers +YouTube
Terms Privacy Policy & Safety Send feedback Try something new!
Up Next 7 Cool Facts about Bearded Dragons | Pet Reptiles
Howcast
Subscribe3,011,382
Add to
Share
More
347,107
1,479 38
Published on Aug 13, 2013
Watch more How to Take Care of Reptiles & Amphibians videos:
http://www.howcast.com/videos/512378-

Learn seven cool facts about bearded dragons from reptile and amphibian
expert Jungle Bob in this Howcast video.

When we think of the continent of Australia, we think of unusual animals
right away, from kangaroos to platypuses to wallabies. They’re all over
there in Australia, it seems. But there are some that are not that unusual,
just fantastic creatures. And one of them is the Pogona Vitticeps, the
Bearded Dragon. There’s a number of different species in Australia, but the
popular one is the dragon you see in front of you here, that has dominated
the pet world now for the last 20 to 25 years.

In their native Australia, they’re inquisitive creatures that easily
inhabit areas where people are. They like to climb fence posts and look out
to see what’s going on. Males will dominate a territory and have multiple
females as mates. And they’re prolific breeders. They have up to 20 eggs at
a time and they dominate the landscape they come from.

They’re quick when they have to be to escape predators. They’re extremely
fast runners. For the most part, they’re kind of sit there and look out and
see what’s going on animals in the wild. They’re very fun and animated to
watch.

They’ll eat a variety of things from insects to greens to small pieces of
meat, such as rodents. Bearded Dragons are largely protected now in their
native Australia. They’re no longer exported, which is very good. Thank
you, Australia, for allowing us to have some of them. But because of their
prolific nature, they are no longer hunted there and they’re free to
multiply and grow in Australia without any danger of being threatened by
the pet trade or by confiscation.

The Bearded Dragon gets his name, as you can see, the big male here is
going to get a little territorial. First he gets up on his front limbs. And
if he gets really agitated with the smaller one in front of him, he’ll do
two things. First, he’ll start bobbing his head up and down to say, “I’m
the biggest dragon in this area, so back off.” And if that doesn’t work, he
actually throws out his throat. It turns black and he puffs it out. It
looks like a big black beard. And that’s where the animal gets his name.

The Bearded Dragon will do that every time an animal is reintroduced into
its area. If he wants to threaten it, he will throw that beard out.
Sometimes in captivity they don’t bother doing it anymore because they’re
so docile by nature and he knows this other dragon, so he’s not really
doing it at this moment.

But two males together, one will dominate the other. He’ll say, “I’m the
biggest dragon here.” If the other one is of equal size and equal
temperament, they will fight. If not, the smaller one actually submits. And
what they do is take their arm and they move it ever so slowly in a counter
clockwise direction and the larger dragon will understand that that’s like
a person saying, “Don’t hit me.” He puts his hands up and says, “I don’t
want to fight.”

So, they work things out together in nature. In nature, of course, they can
disappear and run in different areas. In a captive environment, they have
to have that submissive language going back and forth between them in order
to avoid fights in captivity. The Bearded Dragon, an Australian treasure
for sure.
SHOW MORE
Loading…
Autoplay
Up Next

8 Care Tips for Bearded Dragons | Pet Reptiles
by Howcast
155,538 views

3:02
4 Care Tips for Pixie Frogs | Pet Reptiles
by Howcast
184,795 views

2:05
5 Cool Facts about Leopard Geckos | Pet Reptiles
by Howcast
107,709 views

2:05
7 Care Tips for Leopard Geckos | Pet Reptiles
by Howcast
54,171 views

2:27
Before YOU buy a Bearded Dragon, Watch THIS video!
by Earthling1984
502,756 views

13:01
How To: Take Care Of Bearded Dragon | PansyPan
by Pansy Pan
40,790 views

11:32
Bearded Dragon Husbandry, Proper Caging and Lighting- Carolina Classic
Dragons
by Pogonavision
187,042 views

17:24
Bearded Dragon Laying Eggs & Baby Bearded Dragons
by KB9OKB
133,306 views

10:34
Top 3 Exotic Animals You Can Own As Pets
by Animalist
1,174,240 views

2:52
Bearded dragon Nacho and our kids!
by Jen S
175,592 views

2:52
Bearded Dragon Insanity! Crittacam : AnimalBytesTV
by AnimalBytesTV
66,803 views

5:57
All my 33 pets (updated!)
by SnazzyNikki .
2,873,266 views

16:05
Unboxing My Baby Bearded Dragon
by Ashley
175,460 views

8:54
English bulldog & Bearded Dragon
by CasaDeOrtiz Dragons
150,874 views

1:36
Custom Bearded Dragon Viv
by kaldaka87
173,973 views

3:02
Happy Bearded Dragon Being Silly
by orlandovacationstore
57,809 views

2:14

52
VIDEOS
How to Take Care of Reptiles & Amphibians
by Howcast
Bearded Dragon Brightens Up Before Your Eyes
by rapatator
161,201 views

5:52
Setting up an Enclosure for Bearded Dragons
by Zamzows Superstore
179,684 views

4:04
Is A Bearded Dragon Right for You? | A Guide to Cost, Supplies, Set-Up,
Care, and Rewards
by delfiend
82,808 views

1:13:02 SHOW MORE
Language: English Country: Worldwide Safety: Off History Help
About Press Copyright Creators Advertise Developers +YouTube
Terms Privacy Policy & Safety Send feedback Try something new!
Up Next 7 Cool Facts about Bearded Dragons | Pet Reptiles
Howcast
Subscribe3,011,382
Add to
Share
More
347,107
1,479 38
Published on Aug 13, 2013
Watch more How to Take Care of Reptiles & Amphibians videos:
http://www.howcast.com/videos/512378-

Learn seven cool facts about bearded dragons from reptile and amphibian
expert Jungle Bob in this Howcast video.

When we think of the continent of Australia, we think of unusual animals
right away, from kangaroos to platypuses to wallabies. They’re all over
there in Australia, it seems. But there are some that are not that unusual,
just fantastic creatures. And one of them is the Pogona Vitticeps, the
Bearded Dragon. There’s a number of different species in Australia, but the
popular one is the dragon you see in front of you here, that has dominated
the pet world now for the last 20 to 25 years.

In their native Australia, they’re inquisitive creatures that easily
inhabit areas where people are. They like to climb fence posts and look out
to see what’s going on. Males will dominate a territory and have multiple
females as mates. And they’re prolific breeders. They have up to 20 eggs at
a time and they dominate the landscape they come from.

They’re quick when they have to be to escape predators. They’re extremely
fast runners. For the most part, they’re kind of sit there and look out and
see what’s going on animals in the wild. They’re very fun and animated to
watch.

They’ll eat a variety of things from insects to greens to small pieces of
meat, such as rodents. Bearded Dragons are largely protected now in their
native Australia. They’re no longer exported, which is very good. Thank
you, Australia, for allowing us to have some of them. But because of their
prolific nature, they are no longer hunted there and they’re free to
multiply and grow in Australia without any danger of being threatened by
the pet trade or by confiscation.

The Bearded Dragon gets his name, as you can see, the big male here is
going to get a little territorial. First he gets up on his front limbs. And
if he gets really agitated with the smaller one in front of him, he’ll do
two things. First, he’ll start bobbing his head up and down to say, “I’m
the biggest dragon in this area, so back off.” And if that doesn’t work, he
actually throws out his throat. It turns black and he puffs it out. It
looks like a big black beard. And that’s where the animal gets his name.

The Bearded Dragon will do that every time an animal is reintroduced into
its area. If he wants to threaten it, he will throw that beard out.
Sometimes in captivity they don’t bother doing it anymore because they’re
so docile by nature and he knows this other dragon, so he’s not really
doing it at this moment.

But two males together, one will dominate the other. He’ll say, “I’m the
biggest dragon here.” If the other one is of equal size and equal
temperament, they will fight. If not, the smaller one actually submits. And
what they do is take their arm and they move it ever so slowly in a counter
clockwise direction and the larger dragon will understand that that’s like
a person saying, “Don’t hit me.” He puts his hands up and says, “I don’t
want to fight.”

So, they work things out together in nature. In nature, of course, they can
disappear and run in different areas. In a captive environment, they have
to have that submissive language going back and forth between them in order
to avoid fights in captivity. The Bearded Dragon, an Australian treasure
for sure.
SHOW MORE
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Language: English Country: Worldwide Safety: Off History Help
About Press Copyright Creators Advertise Developers +YouTube
Terms Privacy Policy & Safety Send feedback Try something new!
Up Next 7 Cool Facts about Bearded Dragons | Pet Reptiles
Howcast
Subscribe3,011,382
Add to
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347,107
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Published on Aug 13, 2013
Watch more How to Take Care of Reptiles & Amphibians videos:
http://www.howcast.com/videos/512378-

Learn seven cool facts about bearded dragons from reptile and amphibian
expert Jungle Bob in this Howcast video.

When we think of the continent of Australia, we think of unusual animals
right away, from kangaroos to platypuses to wallabies. They’re all over
there in Australia, it seems. But there are some that are not that unusual,
just fantastic creatures. And one of them is the Pogona Vitticeps, the
Bearded Dragon. There’s a number of different species in Australia, but the
popular one is the dragon you see in front of you here, that has dominated
the pet world now for the last 20 to 25 years.

In their native Australia, they’re inquisitive creatures that easily
inhabit areas where people are. They like to climb fence posts and look out
to see what’s going on. Males will dominate a territory and have multiple
females as mates. And they’re prolific breeders. They have up to 20 eggs at
a time and they dominate the landscape they come from.

They’re quick when they have to be to escape predators. They’re extremely
fast runners. For the most part, they’re kind of sit there and look out and
see what’s going on animals in the wild. They’re very fun and animated to
watch.

They’ll eat a variety of things from insects to greens to small pieces of
meat, such as rodents. Bearded Dragons are largely protected now in their
native Australia. They’re no longer exported, which is very good. Thank
you, Australia, for allowing us to have some of them. But because of their
prolific nature, they are no longer hunted there and they’re free to
multiply and grow in Australia without any danger of being threatened by
the pet trade or by confiscation.

The Bearded Dragon gets his name, as you can see, the big male here is
going to get a little territorial. First he gets up on his front limbs. And
if he gets really agitated with the smaller one in front of him, he’ll do
two things. First, he’ll start bobbing his head up and down to say, “I’m
the biggest dragon in this area, so back off.” And if that doesn’t work, he
actually throws out his throat. It turns black and he puffs it out. It
looks like a big black beard. And that’s where the animal gets his name.

The Bearded Dragon will do that every time an animal is reintroduced into
its area. If he wants to threaten it, he will throw that beard out.
Sometimes in captivity they don’t bother doing it anymore because they’re
so docile by nature and he knows this other dragon, so he’s not really
doing it at this moment.

But two males together, one will dominate the other. He’ll say, “I’m the
biggest dragon here.” If the other one is of equal size and equal
temperament, they will fight. If not, the smaller one actually submits. And
what they do is take their arm and they move it ever so slowly in a counter
clockwise direction and the larger dragon will understand that that’s like
a person saying, “Don’t hit me.” He puts his hands up and says, “I don’t
want to fight.”

So, they work things out together in nature. In nature, of course, they can
disappear and run in different areas. In a captive environment, they have
to have that submissive language going back and forth between them in order
to avoid fights in captivity. The Bearded Dragon, an Australian treasure
for sure.
SHOW MORE
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Bearded Dragon Brightens Up Before Your Eyes
by rapatator
161,201 views

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Setting up an Enclosure for Bearded Dragons
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Is A Bearded Dragon Right for You? | A Guide to Cost, Supplies, Set-Up,
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by delfiend
82,808 views

1:13:02 SHOW MORE
Language: English Country: Worldwide Safety: Off History Help
About Press Copyright Creators Advertise Developers +YouTube
Terms Privacy Policy & Safety Send feedback Try something new!
Up Next 7 Cool Facts about Bearded Dragons | Pet Reptiles
Howcast
Subscribe3,011,382
Add to
Share
More
347,107
1,479 38
Published on Aug 13, 2013
Watch more How to Take Care of Reptiles & Amphibians videos:
http://www.howcast.com/videos/512378-

Learn seven cool facts about bearded dragons from reptile and amphibian
expert Jungle Bob in this Howcast video.

When we think of the continent of Australia, we think of unusual animals
right away, from kangaroos to platypuses to wallabies. They’re all over
there in Australia, it seems. But there are some that are not that unusual,
just fantastic creatures. And one of them is the Pogona Vitticeps, the
Bearded Dragon. There’s a number of different species in Australia, but the
popular one is the dragon you see in front of you here, that has dominated
the pet world now for the last 20 to 25 years.

In their native Australia, they’re inquisitive creatures that easily
inhabit areas where people are. They like to climb fence posts and look out
to see what’s going on. Males will dominate a territory and have multiple
females as mates. And they’re prolific breeders. They have up to 20 eggs at
a time and they dominate the landscape they come from.

They’re quick when they have to be to escape predators. They’re extremely
fast runners. For the most part, they’re kind of sit there and look out and
see what’s going on animals in the wild. They’re very fun and animated to
watch.

They’ll eat a variety of things from insects to greens to small pieces of
meat, such as rodents. Bearded Dragons are largely protected now in their
native Australia. They’re no longer exported, which is very good. Thank
you, Australia, for allowing us to have some of them. But because of their
prolific nature, they are no longer hunted there and they’re free to
multiply and grow in Australia without any danger of being threatened by
the pet trade or by confiscation.

The Bearded Dragon gets his name, as you can see, the big male here is
going to get a little territorial. First he gets up on his front limbs. And
if he gets really agitated with the smaller one in front of him, he’ll do
two things. First, he’ll start bobbing his head up and down to say, “I’m
the biggest dragon in this area, so back off.” And if that doesn’t work, he
actually throws out his throat. It turns black and he puffs it out. It
looks like a big black beard. And that’s where the animal gets his name.

The Bearded Dragon will do that every time an animal is reintroduced into
its area. If he wants to threaten it, he will throw that beard out.
Sometimes in captivity they don’t bother doing it anymore because they’re
so docile by nature and he knows this other dragon, so he’s not really
doing it at this moment.

But two males together, one will dominate the other. He’ll say, “I’m the
biggest dragon here.” If the other one is of equal size and equal
temperament, they will fight. If not, the smaller one actually submits. And
what they do is take their arm and they move it ever so slowly in a counter
clockwise direction and the larger dragon will understand that that’s like
a person saying, “Don’t hit me.” He puts his hands up and says, “I don’t
want to fight.”

So, they work things out together in nature. In nature, of course, they can
disappear and run in different areas. In a captive environment, they have
to have that submissive language going back and forth between them in order
to avoid fights in captivity. The Bearded Dragon, an Australian treasure
for sure.
SHOW MORE
Loading…
Autoplay
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8:54
English bu

Maddi Holmes says:

What species is this? Or are all species pretty safe as pets (I want a tame
lizard). I live in Australia so my species options are a lot wider than
someone outside the country, and I don’t know which is best!

Zakary Kennedy says:

I have a bearded dragon and he is probably the best pet i ever had, hes a
cool little fella :)

Luke Needham says:

Howcast
Subscribe3,011,382
Add to
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More
347,107
1,479 38
Published on Aug 13, 2013
Watch more How to Take Care of Reptiles & Amphibians videos:
http://www.howcast.com/videos/512378-

Learn seven cool facts about bearded dragons from reptile and amphibian
expert Jungle Bob in this Howcast video.

When we think of the continent of Australia, we think of unusual animals
right away, from kangaroos to platypuses to wallabies. They’re all over
there in Australia, it seems. But there are some that are not that unusual,
just fantastic creatures. And one of them is the Pogona Vitticeps, the
Bearded Dragon. There’s a number of different species in Australia, but the
popular one is the dragon you see in front of you here, that has dominated
the pet world now for the last 20 to 25 years.

In their native Australia, they’re inquisitive creatures that easily
inhabit areas where people are. They like to climb fence posts and look out
to see what’s going on. Males will dominate a territory and have multiple
females as mates. And they’re prolific breeders. They have up to 20 eggs at
a time and they dominate the landscape they come from.

They’re quick when they have to be to escape predators. They’re extremely
fast runners. For the most part, they’re kind of sit there and look out and
see what’s going on animals in the wild. They’re very fun and animated to
watch.

They’ll eat a variety of things from insects to greens to small pieces of
meat, such as rodents. Bearded Dragons are largely protected now in their
native Australia. They’re no longer exported, which is very good. Thank
you, Australia, for allowing us to have some of them. But because of their
prolific nature, they are no longer hunted there and they’re free to
multiply and grow in Australia without any danger of being threatened by
the pet trade or by confiscation.

The Bearded Dragon gets his name, as you can see, the big male here is
going to get a little territorial. First he gets up on his front limbs. And
if he gets really agitated with the smaller one in front of him, he’ll do
two things. First, he’ll start bobbing his head up and down to say, “I’m
the biggest dragon in this area, so back off.” And if that doesn’t work, he
actually throws out his throat. It turns black and he puffs it out. It
looks like a big black beard. And that’s where the animal gets his name.

The Bearded Dragon will do that every time an animal is reintroduced into
its area. If he wants to threaten it, he will throw that beard out.
Sometimes in captivity they don’t bother doing it anymore because they’re
so docile by nature and he knows this other dragon, so he’s not really
doing it at this moment.

But two males together, one will dominate the other. He’ll say, “I’m the
biggest dragon here.” If the other one is of equal size and equal
temperament, they will fight. If not, the smaller one actually submits. And
what they do is take their arm and they move it ever so slowly in a counter
clockwise direction and the larger dragon will understand that that’s like
a person saying, “Don’t hit me.” He puts his hands up and says, “I don’t
want to fight.”

So, they work things out together in nature. In nature, of course, they can
disappear and run in different areas. In a captive environment, they have
to have that submissive language going back and forth between them in order
to avoid fights in captivity. The Bearded Dragon, an Australian treasure
for sure.
SHOW MORE
Loading…
Autoplay
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by Howcast
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by Howcast
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by rapatator
161,201 views

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by delfiend
82,808 views

1:13:02 SHOW MORE
Language: English Country: Worldwide Safety: Off History Help
About Press Copyright Creators Advertise Developers +YouTube
Terms Privacy Policy & Safety Send feedback Try something new!
Up Next 7 Cool Facts about Bearded Dragons | Pet Reptiles
Howcast
Subscribe3,011,382
Add to
Share
More
347,107
1,479 38
Published on Aug 13, 2013
Watch more How to Take Care of Reptiles & Amphibians videos:
http://www.howcast.com/videos/512378-

Learn seven cool facts about bearded dragons from reptile and amphibian
expert Jungle Bob in this Howcast video.

When we think of the continent of Australia, we think of unusual animals
right away, from kangaroos to platypuses to wallabies. They’re all over
there in Australia, it seems. But there are some that are not that unusual,
just fantastic creatures. And one of them is the Pogona Vitticeps, the
Bearded Dragon. There’s a number of different species in Australia, but the
popular one is the dragon you see in front of you here, that has dominated
the pet world now for the last 20 to 25 years.

In their native Australia, they’re inquisitive creatures that easily
inhabit areas where people are. They like to climb fence posts and look out
to see what’s going on. Males will dominate a territory and have multiple
females as mates. And they’re prolific breeders. They have up to 20 eggs at
a time and they dominate the landscape they come from.

They’re quick when they have to be to escape predators. They’re extremely
fast runners. For the most part, they’re kind of sit there and look out and
see what’s going on animals in the wild. They’re very fun and animated to
watch.

They’ll eat a variety of things from insects to greens to small pieces of
meat, such as rodents. Bearded Dragons are largely protected now in their
native Australia. They’re no longer exported, which is very good. Thank
you, Australia, for allowing us to have some of them. But because of their
prolific nature, they are no longer hunted there and they’re free to
multiply and grow in Australia without any danger of being threatened by
the pet trade or by confiscation.

The Bearded Dragon gets his name, as you can see, the big male here is
going to get a little territorial. First he gets up on his front limbs. And
if he gets really agitated with the smaller one in front of him, he’ll do
two things. First, he’ll start bobbing his head up and down to say, “I’m
the biggest dragon in this area, so back off.” And if that doesn’t work, he
actually throws out his throat. It turns black and he puffs it out. It
looks like a big black beard. And that’s where the animal gets his name.

The Bearded Dragon will do that every time an animal is reintroduced into
its area. If he wants to threaten it, he will throw that beard out.
Sometimes in captivity they don’t bother doing it anymore because they’re
so docile by nature and he knows this other dragon, so he’s not really
doing it at this moment.

But two males together, one will dominate the other. He’ll say, “I’m the
biggest dragon here.” If the other one is of equal size and equal
temperament, they will fight. If not, the smaller one actually submits. And
what they do is take their arm and they move it ever so slowly in a counter
clockwise direction and the larger dragon will understand that that’s like
a person saying, “Don’t hit me.” He puts his hands up and says, “I don’t
want to fight.”

So, they work things out together in nature. In nature, of course, they can
disappear and run in different areas. In a captive environment, they have
to have that submissive language going back and forth between them in order
to avoid fights in captivity. The Bearded Dragon, an Australian treasure
for sure.
SHOW MORE
Loading…
Autoplay
Up Next

8 Care Tips for Bearded Dragons | Pet Reptiles
by Howcast
155,538 views

3:02
4 Care Tips for Pixie Frogs | Pet Reptiles
by Howcast
184,795 views

2:05
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by Howcast
107,709 views

2:05
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by Howcast
54,171 views

2:27
Before YOU buy a Bearded Dragon, Watch THIS video!
by Earthling1984
502,756 views

13:01
How To: Take Care Of Bearded Dragon | PansyPan
by Pansy Pan
40,790 views

11:32
Bearded Dragon Husbandry, Proper Caging and Lighting- Carolina Classic
Dragons
by Pogonavision
187,042 views

17:24
Bearded Dragon Laying Eggs & Baby Bearded Dragons
by KB9OKB
133,306 views

10:34
Top 3 Exotic Animals You Can Own As Pets
by Animalist
1,174,240 views

2:52
Bearded dragon Nacho and our kids!
by Jen S
175,592 views

2:52
Bearded Dragon Insanity! Crittacam : AnimalBytesTV
by AnimalBytesTV
66,803 views

5:57
All my 33 pets (updated!)
by SnazzyNikki .
2,873,266 views

16:05
Unboxing My Baby Bearded Dragon
by Ashley
175,460 views

8:54
English bulldog & Bearded Dragon
by CasaDeOrtiz Dragons
150,874 views

1:36
Custom Bearded Dragon Viv
by kaldaka87
173,973 views

3:02
Happy Bearded Dragon Being Silly
by orlandovacationstore
57,809 views

2:14

52
VIDEOS
How to Take Care of Reptiles & Amphibians
by Howcast
Bearded Dragon Brightens Up Before Your Eyes
by rapatator
161,201 views

5:52
Setting up an Enclosure for Bearded Dragons
by Zamzows Superstore
179,684 views

4:04
Is A Bearded Dragon Right for You? | A Guide to Cost, Supplies, Set-Up,
Care, and Rewards
by delfiend
82,808 views

1:13:02 SHOW MORE
Language: English Country: Worldwide Safety: Off History Help
About Press Copyright Creators Advertise Developers +YouTube
Terms Privacy Policy & Safety Send feedback Try something new!
Up Next 7 Cool Facts about Bearded Dragons | Pet Reptiles
Howcast
Subscribe3,011,382
Add to
Share
More
347,107
1,479 38
Published on Aug 13, 2013
Watch more How to Take Care of Reptiles & Amphibians videos:
http://www.howcast.com/videos/512378-

Learn seven cool facts about bearded dragons from reptile and amphibian
expert Jungle Bob in this Howcast video.

When we think of the continent of Australia, we think of unusual animals
right away, from kangaroos to platypuses to wallabies. They’re all over
there in Australia, it seems. But there are some that are not that unusual,
just fantastic creatures. And one of them is the Pogona Vitticeps, the
Bearded Dragon. There’s a number of different species in Australia, but the
popular one is the dragon you see in front of you here, that has dominated
the pet world now for the last 20 to 25 years.

In their native Australia, they’re inquisitive creatures that easily
inhabit areas where people are. They like to climb fence posts and look out
to see what’s going on. Males will dominate a territory and have multiple
females as mates. And they’re prolific breeders. They have up to 20 eggs at
a time and they dominate the landscape they come from.

They’re quick when they have to be to escape predators. They’re extremely
fast runners. For the most part, they’re kind of sit there and look out and
see what’s going on animals in the wild. They’re very fun and animated to
watch.

They’ll eat a variety of things from insects to greens to small pieces of
meat, such as rodents. Bearded Dragons are largely protected now in their
native Australia. They’re no longer exported, which is very good. Thank
you, Australia, for allowing us to have some of them. But because of their
prolific nature, they are no longer hunted there and they’re free to
multiply and grow in Australia without any danger of being threatened by
the pet trade or by confiscation.

The Bearded Dragon gets his name, as you can see, the big male here is
going to get a little territorial. First he gets up on his front limbs. And
if he gets really agitated with the smaller one in front of him, he’ll do
two things. First, he’ll start bobbing his head up and down to say, “I’m
the biggest dragon in this area, so back off.” And if that doesn’t work, he
actually throws out his throat. It turns black and he puffs it out. It
looks like a big black beard. And that’s where the animal gets his name.

The Bearded Dragon will do that every time an animal is reintroduced into
its area. If he wants to threaten it, he will throw that beard out.
Sometimes in captivity they don’t bother doing it anymore because they’re
so docile by nature and he knows this other dragon, so he’s not really
doing it at this moment.

But two males together, one will dominate the other. He’ll say, “I’m the
biggest dragon here.” If the other one is of equal size and equal
temperament, they will fight. If not, the smaller one actually submits. And
what they do is take their arm and they move it ever so slowly in a counter
clockwise direction and the larger dragon will understand that that’s like
a person saying, “Don’t hit me.” He puts his hands up and says, “I don’t
want to fight.”

So, they work things out together in nature. In nature, of course, they can
disappear and run in different areas. In a captive environment, they have
to have that submissive language going back and forth between them in order
to avoid fights in captivity. The Bearded Dragon, an Australian treasure
for sure.
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Language: English Country: Worldwide Safety: Off History Help
About Press Copyright Creators Advertise Developers +YouTube
Terms Privacy Policy & Safety Send feedback Try something new!
Up Next 7 Cool Facts about Bearded Dragons | Pet Reptiles
Howcast
Subscribe3,011,382
Add to
Share
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347,107
1,479 38
Published on Aug 13, 2013
Watch more How to Take Care of Reptiles & Amphibians videos:
http://www.howcast.com/videos/512378-

Learn seven cool facts about bearded dragons from reptile and amphibian
expert Jungle Bob in this Howcast video.

When we think of the continent of Australia, we think of unusual animals
right away, from kangaroos to platypuses to wallabies. They’re all over
there in Australia, it seems. But there are some that are not that unusual,
just fantastic creatures. And one of them is the Pogona Vitticeps, the
Bearded Dragon. There’s a number of different species in Australia, but the
popular one is the dragon you see in front of you here, that has dominated
the pet world now for the last 20 to 25 years.

In their native Australia, they’re inquisitive creatures that easily
inhabit areas where people are. They like to climb fence posts and look out
to see what’s going on. Males will dominate a territory and have multiple
females as mates. And they’re prolific breeders. They have up to 20 eggs at
a time and they dominate the landscape they come from.

They’re quick when they have to be to escape predators. They’re extremely
fast runners. For the most part, they’re kind of sit there and look out and
see what’s going on animals in the wild. They’re very fun and animated to
watch.

They’ll eat a variety of things from insects to greens to small pieces of
meat, such as rodents. Bearded Dragons are largely protected now in their
native Australia. They’re no longer exported, which is very good. Thank
you, Australia, for allowing us to have some of them. But because of their
prolific nature, they are no longer hunted there and they’re free to
multiply and grow in Australia without any danger of being threatened by
the pet trade or by confiscation.

The Bearded Dragon gets his name, as you can see, the big male here is
going to get a little territorial. First he gets up on his front limbs. And
if he gets really agitated with the smaller one in front of him, he’ll do
two things. First, he’ll start bobbing his head up and down to say, “I’m
the biggest dragon in this area, so back off.” And if that doesn’t work, he
actually throws out his throat. It turns black and he puffs it out. It
looks like a big black beard. And that’s where the animal gets his name.

The Bearded Dragon will do that every time an animal is reintroduced into
its area. If he wants to threaten it, he will throw that beard out.
Sometimes in captivity they don’t bother doing it anymore because they’re
so docile by nature and he knows this other dragon, so he’s not really
doing it at this moment.

But two males together, one will dominate the other. He’ll say, “I’m the
biggest dragon here.” If the other one is of equal size and equal
temperament, they will fight. If not, the smaller one actually submits. And
what they do is take their arm and they move it ever so slowly in a counter
clockwise direction and the larger dragon will understand that that’s like
a person saying, “Don’t hit me.” He puts his hands up and says, “I don’t
want to fight.”

So, they work things out together in nature. In nature, of course, they can
disappear and run in different areas. In a captive environment, they have
to have that submissive language going back and forth between them in order
to avoid fights in captivity. The Bearded Dragon, an Australian treasure
for sure.
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Language: English Country: Worldwide Safety: Off History Help
About Press Copyright Creators Advertise Developers +YouTube
Terms Privacy Policy & Safety Send feedback Try something new!
Up Next 7 Cool Facts about Bearded Dragons | Pet Reptiles
Howcast
Subscribe3,011,382
Add to
Share
More
347,107
1,479 38
Published on Aug 13, 2013
Watch more How to Take Care of Reptiles & Amphibians videos:
http://www.howcast.com/videos/512378-

Learn seven cool facts about bearded dragons from reptile and amphibian
expert Jungle Bob in this Howcast video.

When we think of the continent of Australia, we think of unusual animals
right away, from kangaroos to platypuses to wallabies. They’re all over
there in Australia, it seems. But there are some that are not that unusual,
just fantastic creatures. And one of them is the Pogona Vitticeps, the
Bearded Dragon. There’s a number of different species in Australia, but the
popular one is the dragon you see in front of you here, that has dominated
the pet world now for the last 20 to 25 years.

In their native Australia, they’re inquisitive creatures that easily
inhabit areas where people are. They like to climb fence posts and look out
to see what’s going on. Males will dominate a territory and have multiple
females as mates. And they’re prolific breeders. They have up to 20 eggs at
a time and they dominate the landscape they come from.

They’re quick when they have to be to escape predators. They’re extremely
fast runners. For the most part, they’re kind of sit there and look out and
see what’s going on animals in the wild. They’re very fun and animated to
watch.

They’ll eat a variety of things from insects to greens to small pieces of
meat, such as rodents. Bearded Dragons are largely protected now in their
native Australia. They’re no longer exported, which is very good. Thank
you, Australia, for allowing us to have some of them. But because of their
prolific nature, they are no longer hunted there and they’re free to
multiply and grow in Australia without any danger of being threatened by
the pet trade or by confiscation.

The Bearded Dragon gets his name, as you can see, the big male here is
going to get a little territorial. First he gets up on his front limbs. And
if he gets really agitated with the smaller one in front of him, he’ll do
two things. First, he’ll start bobbing his head up and down to say, “I’m
the biggest dragon in this area, so back off.” And if that doesn’t work, he
actually throws out his throat. It turns black and he puffs it out. It
looks like a big black beard. And that’s where the animal gets his name.

The Bearded Dragon will do that every time an animal is reintroduced into
its area. If he wants to threaten it, he will throw that beard out.
Sometimes in captivity they don’t bother doing it anymore because they’re
so docile by nature and he knows this other dragon, so he’s not really
doing it at this moment.

But two males together, one will dominate the other. He’ll say, “I’m the
biggest dragon here.” If the other one is of equal size and equal
temperament, they will fight. If not, the smaller one actually submits. And
what they do is take their arm and they move it ever so slowly in a counter
clockwise direction and the larger dragon will understand that that’s like
a person saying, “Don’t hit me.” He puts his hands up and says, “I don’t
want to fight.”

So, they work things out together in nature. In nature, of course, they can
disappear and run in different areas. In a captive environment, they have
to have that submissive language going back and forth between them in order
to avoid fights in captivity. The Bearded Dragon, an Australian treasure
for sure.
SHOW MORE
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Language: English Country: Worldwide Safety: Off History Help
About Press Copyright Creators Advertise Developers +YouTube
Terms Privacy Policy & Safety Send feedback Try something new!
Up Next 7 Cool Facts about Bearded Dragons | Pet Reptiles
Howcast
Subscribe3,011,382
Add to
Share
More
347,107
1,479 38
Published on Aug 13, 2013
Watch more How to Take Care of Reptiles & Amphibians videos:
http://www.howcast.com/videos/512378-

Learn seven cool facts about bearded dragons from reptile and amphibian
expert Jungle Bob in this Howcast video.

When we think of the continent of Australia, we think of unusual animals
right away, from kangaroos to platypuses to wallabies. They’re all over
there in Australia, it seems. But there are some that are not that unusual,
just fantastic creatures. And one of them is the Pogona Vitticeps, the
Bearded Dragon. There’s a number of different species in Australia, but the
popular one is the dragon you see in front of you here, that has dominated
the pet world now for the last 20 to 25 years.

In their native Australia, they’re inquisitive creatures that easily
inhabit areas where people are. They like to climb fence posts and look out
to see what’s going on. Males will dominate a territory and have multiple
females as mates. And they’re prolific breeders. They have up to 20 eggs at
a time and they dominate the landscape they come from.

They’re quick when they have to be to escape predators. They’re extremely
fast runners. For the most part, they’re kind of sit there and look out and
see what’s going on animals in the wild. They’re very fun and animated to
watch.

They’ll eat a variety of things from insects to greens to small pieces of
meat, such as rodents. Bearded Dragons are largely protected now in their
native Australia. They’re no longer exported, which is very good. Thank
you, Australia, for allowing us to have some of them. But because of their
prolific nature, they are no longer hunted there and they’re free to
multiply and grow in Australia without any danger of being threatened by
the pet trade or by confiscation.

The Bearded Dragon gets his name, as you can see, the big male here is
going to get a little territorial. First he gets up on his front limbs. And
if he gets really agitated with the smaller one in front of him, he’ll do
two things. First, he’ll start bobbing his head up and down to say, “I’m
the biggest dragon in this area, so back off.” And if that doesn’t work, he
actually throws out his throat. It turns black and he puffs it out. It
looks like a big black beard. And that’s where the animal gets his name.

The Bearded Dragon will do that every time an animal is reintroduced into
its area. If he wants to threaten it, he will throw that beard out.
Sometimes in captivity they don’t bother doing it anymore because they’re
so docile by nature and he knows this other dragon, so he’s not really
doing it at this moment.

But two males together, one will dominate the other. He’ll say, “I’m the
biggest dragon here.” If the other one is of equal size and equal
temperament, they will fight. If not, the smaller one actually submits. And
what they do is take their arm and they move it ever so slowly in a counter
clockwise direction and the larger dragon will understand that that’s like
a person saying, “Don’t hit me.” He puts his hands up and says, “I don’t
want to fight.”

So, they work things out together in nature. In nature, of course, they can
disappear and run in different areas. In a captive environment, they have
to have that submissive language going back and forth between them in order
to avoid fights in captivity. The Bearded Dragon, an Australian treasure
for sure.
SHOW MORE
Loading…
Autoplay
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offtwik23 says:

My beardie is 14 going on 15, is that normal or is she a vampire beardie?
o.o

Luke Needham says:

Howcast
Subscribe3,011,382
Add to
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347,107
1,479 38
Published on Aug 13, 2013
Watch more How to Take Care of Reptiles & Amphibians videos:
http://www.howcast.com/videos/512378-

Learn seven cool facts about bearded dragons from reptile and amphibian
expert Jungle Bob in this Howcast video.

When we think of the continent of Australia, we think of unusual animals
right away, from kangaroos to platypuses to wallabies. They’re all over
there in Australia, it seems. But there are some that are not that unusual,
just fantastic creatures. And one of them is the Pogona Vitticeps, the
Bearded Dragon. There’s a number of different species in Australia, but the
popular one is the dragon you see in front of you here, that has dominated
the pet world now for the last 20 to 25 years.

In their native Australia, they’re inquisitive creatures that easily
inhabit areas where people are. They like to climb fence posts and look out
to see what’s going on. Males will dominate a territory and have multiple
females as mates. And they’re prolific breeders. They have up to 20 eggs at
a time and they dominate the landscape they come from.

They’re quick when they have to be to escape predators. They’re extremely
fast runners. For the most part, they’re kind of sit there and look out and
see what’s going on animals in the wild. They’re very fun and animated to
watch.

They’ll eat a variety of things from insects to greens to small pieces of
meat, such as rodents. Bearded Dragons are largely protected now in their
native Australia. They’re no longer exported, which is very good. Thank
you, Australia, for allowing us to have some of them. But because of their
prolific nature, they are no longer hunted there and they’re free to
multiply and grow in Australia without any danger of being threatened by
the pet trade or by confiscation.

The Bearded Dragon gets his name, as you can see, the big male here is
going to get a little territorial. First he gets up on his front limbs. And
if he gets really agitated with the smaller one in front of him, he’ll do
two things. First, he’ll start bobbing his head up and down to say, “I’m
the biggest dragon in this area, so back off.” And if that doesn’t work, he
actually throws out his throat. It turns black and he puffs it out. It
looks like a big black beard. And that’s where the animal gets his name.

The Bearded Dragon will do that every time an animal is reintroduced into
its area. If he wants to threaten it, he will throw that beard out.
Sometimes in captivity they don’t bother doing it anymore because they’re
so docile by nature and he knows this other dragon, so he’s not really
doing it at this moment.

But two males together, one will dominate the other. He’ll say, “I’m the
biggest dragon here.” If the other one is of equal size and equal
temperament, they will fight. If not, the smaller one actually submits. And
what they do is take their arm and they move it ever so slowly in a counter
clockwise direction and the larger dragon will understand that that’s like
a person saying, “Don’t hit me.” He puts his hands up and says, “I don’t
want to fight.”

So, they work things out together in nature. In nature, of course, they can
disappear and run in different areas. In a captive environment, they have
to have that submissive language going back and forth between them in order
to avoid fights in captivity. The Bearded Dragon, an Australian treasure
for sure.
SHOW MORE
Loading…
Autoplay
Up Next

8 Care Tips for Bearded Dragons | Pet Reptiles
by Howcast
155,538 views

3:02
4 Care Tips for Pixie Frogs | Pet Reptiles
by Howcast
184,795 views

2:05
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by Howcast
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2:05
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by Howcast
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2:27
Before YOU buy a Bearded Dragon, Watch THIS video!
by Earthling1984
502,756 views

13:01
How To: Take Care Of Bearded Dragon | PansyPan
by Pansy Pan
40,790 views

11:32
Bearded Dragon Husbandry, Proper Caging and Lighting- Carolina Classic
Dragons
by Pogonavision
187,042 views

17:24
Bearded Dragon Laying Eggs & Baby Bearded Dragons
by KB9OKB
133,306 views

10:34
Top 3 Exotic Animals You Can Own As Pets
by Animalist
1,174,240 views

2:52
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by Jen S
175,592 views

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by AnimalBytesTV
66,803 views

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All my 33 pets (updated!)
by SnazzyNikki .
2,873,266 views

16:05
Unboxing My Baby Bearded Dragon
by Ashley
175,460 views

8:54
English bulldog & Bearded Dragon
by CasaDeOrtiz Dragons
150,874 views

1:36
Custom Bearded Dragon Viv
by kaldaka87
173,973 views

3:02
Happy Bearded Dragon Being Silly
by orlandovacationstore
57,809 views

2:14

52
VIDEOS
How to Take Care of Reptiles & Amphibians
by Howcast
Bearded Dragon Brightens Up Before Your Eyes
by rapatator
161,201 views

5:52
Setting up an Enclosure for Bearded Dragons
by Zamzows Superstore
179,684 views

4:04
Is A Bearded Dragon Right for You? | A Guide to Cost, Supplies, Set-Up,
Care, and Rewards
by delfiend
82,808 views

1:13:02 SHOW MORE
Language: English Country: Worldwide Safety: Off History Help
About Press Copyright Creators Advertise Developers +YouTube
Terms Privacy Policy & Safety Send feedback Try something new!
Up Next 7 Cool Facts about Bearded Dragons | Pet Reptiles
Howcast
Subscribe3,011,382
Add to
Share
More
347,107
1,479 38
Published on Aug 13, 2013
Watch more How to Take Care of Reptiles & Amphibians videos:
http://www.howcast.com/videos/512378-

Learn seven cool facts about bearded dragons from reptile and amphibian
expert Jungle Bob in this Howcast video.

When we think of the continent of Australia, we think of unusual animals
right away, from kangaroos to platypuses to wallabies. They’re all over
there in Australia, it seems. But there are some that are not that unusual,
just fantastic creatures. And one of them is the Pogona Vitticeps, the
Bearded Dragon. There’s a number of different species in Australia, but the
popular one is the dragon you see in front of you here, that has dominated
the pet world now for the last 20 to 25 years.

In their native Australia, they’re inquisitive creatures that easily
inhabit areas where people are. They like to climb fence posts and look out
to see what’s going on. Males will dominate a territory and have multiple
females as mates. And they’re prolific breeders. They have up to 20 eggs at
a time and they dominate the landscape they come from.

They’re quick when they have to be to escape predators. They’re extremely
fast runners. For the most part, they’re kind of sit there and look out and
see what’s going on animals in the wild. They’re very fun and animated to
watch.

They’ll eat a variety of things from insects to greens to small pieces of
meat, such as rodents. Bearded Dragons are largely protected now in their
native Australia. They’re no longer exported, which is very good. Thank
you, Australia, for allowing us to have some of them. But because of their
prolific nature, they are no longer hunted there and they’re free to
multiply and grow in Australia without any danger of being threatened by
the pet trade or by confiscation.

The Bearded Dragon gets his name, as you can see, the big male here is
going to get a little territorial. First he gets up on his front limbs. And
if he gets really agitated with the smaller one in front of him, he’ll do
two things. First, he’ll start bobbing his head up and down to say, “I’m
the biggest dragon in this area, so back off.” And if that doesn’t work, he
actually throws out his throat. It turns black and he puffs it out. It
looks like a big black beard. And that’s where the animal gets his name.

The Bearded Dragon will do that every time an animal is reintroduced into
its area. If he wants to threaten it, he will throw that beard out.
Sometimes in captivity they don’t bother doing it anymore because they’re
so docile by nature and he knows this other dragon, so he’s not really
doing it at this moment.

But two males together, one will dominate the other. He’ll say, “I’m the
biggest dragon here.” If the other one is of equal size and equal
temperament, they will fight. If not, the smaller one actually submits. And
what they do is take their arm and they move it ever so slowly in a counter
clockwise direction and the larger dragon will understand that that’s like
a person saying, “Don’t hit me.” He puts his hands up and says, “I don’t
want to fight.”

So, they work things out together in nature. In nature, of course, they can
disappear and run in different areas. In a captive environment, they have
to have that submissive language going back and forth between them in order
to avoid fights in captivity. The Bearded Dragon, an Australian treasure
for sure.
SHOW MORE
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Language: English Country: Worldwide Safety: Off History Help
About Press Copyright Creators Advertise Developers +YouTube
Terms Privacy Policy & Safety Send feedback Try something new!
Up Next 7 Cool Facts about Bearded Dragons | Pet Reptiles
Howcast
Subscribe3,011,382
Add to
Share
More
347,107
1,479 38
Published on Aug 13, 2013
Watch more How to Take Care of Reptiles & Amphibians videos:
http://www.howcast.com/videos/512378-

Learn seven cool facts about bearded dragons from reptile and amphibian
expert Jungle Bob in this Howcast video.

When we think of the continent of Australia, we think of unusual animals
right away, from kangaroos to platypuses to wallabies. They’re all over
there in Australia, it seems. But there are some that are not that unusual,
just fantastic creatures. And one of them is the Pogona Vitticeps, the
Bearded Dragon. There’s a number of different species in Australia, but the
popular one is the dragon you see in front of you here, that has dominated
the pet world now for the last 20 to 25 years.

In their native Australia, they’re inquisitive creatures that easily
inhabit areas where people are. They like to climb fence posts and look out
to see what’s going on. Males will dominate a territory and have multiple
females as mates. And they’re prolific breeders. They have up to 20 eggs at
a time and they dominate the landscape they come from.

They’re quick when they have to be to escape predators. They’re extremely
fast runners. For the most part, they’re kind of sit there and look out and
see what’s going on animals in the wild. They’re very fun and animated to
watch.

They’ll eat a variety of things from insects to greens to small pieces of
meat, such as rodents. Bearded Dragons are largely protected now in their
native Australia. They’re no longer exported, which is very good. Thank
you, Australia, for allowing us to have some of them. But because of their
prolific nature, they are no longer hunted there and they’re free to
multiply and grow in Australia without any danger of being threatened by
the pet trade or by confiscation.

The Bearded Dragon gets his name, as you can see, the big male here is
going to get a little territorial. First he gets up on his front limbs. And
if he gets really agitated with the smaller one in front of him, he’ll do
two things. First, he’ll start bobbing his head up and down to say, “I’m
the biggest dragon in this area, so back off.” And if that doesn’t work, he
actually throws out his throat. It turns black and he puffs it out. It
looks like a big black beard. And that’s where the animal gets his name.

The Bearded Dragon will do that every time an animal is reintroduced into
its area. If he wants to threaten it, he will throw that beard out.
Sometimes in captivity they don’t bother doing it anymore because they’re
so docile by nature and he knows this other dragon, so he’s not really
doing it at this moment.

But two males together, one will dominate the other. He’ll say, “I’m the
biggest dragon here.” If the other one is of equal size and equal
temperament, they will fight. If not, the smaller one actually submits. And
what they do is take their arm and they move it ever so slowly in a counter
clockwise direction and the larger dragon will understand that that’s like
a person saying, “Don’t hit me.” He puts his hands up and says, “I don’t
want to fight.”

So, they work things out together in nature. In nature, of course, they can
disappear and run in different areas. In a captive environment, they have
to have that submissive language going back and forth between them in order
to avoid fights in captivity. The Bearded Dragon, an Australian treasure
for sure.
SHOW MORE
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by rapatator
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1:13:02 SHOW MORE
Language: English Country: Worldwide Safety: Off History Help
About Press Copyright Creators Advertise Developers +YouTube
Terms Privacy Policy & Safety Send feedback Try something new!
Up Next 7 Cool Facts about Bearded Dragons | Pet Reptiles
Howcast
Subscribe3,011,382
Add to
Share
More
347,107
1,479 38
Published on Aug 13, 2013
Watch more How to Take Care of Reptiles & Amphibians videos:
http://www.howcast.com/videos/512378-

Learn seven cool facts about bearded dragons from reptile and amphibian
expert Jungle Bob in this Howcast video.

When we think of the continent of Australia, we think of unusual animals
right away, from kangaroos to platypuses to wallabies. They’re all over
there in Australia, it seems. But there are some that are not that unusual,
just fantastic creatures. And one of them is the Pogona Vitticeps, the
Bearded Dragon. There’s a number of different species in Australia, but the
popular one is the dragon you see in front of you here, that has dominated
the pet world now for the last 20 to 25 years.

In their native Australia, they’re inquisitive creatures that easily
inhabit areas where people are. They like to climb fence posts and look out
to see what’s going on. Males will dominate a territory and have multiple
females as mates. And they’re prolific breeders. They have up to 20 eggs at
a time and they dominate the landscape they come from.

They’re quick when they have to be to escape predators. They’re extremely
fast runners. For the most part, they’re kind of sit there and look out and
see what’s going on animals in the wild. They’re very fun and animated to
watch.

They’ll eat a variety of things from insects to greens to small pieces of
meat, such as rodents. Bearded Dragons are largely protected now in their
native Australia. They’re no longer exported, which is very good. Thank
you, Australia, for allowing us to have some of them. But because of their
prolific nature, they are no longer hunted there and they’re free to
multiply and grow in Australia without any danger of being threatened by
the pet trade or by confiscation.

The Bearded Dragon gets his name, as you can see, the big male here is
going to get a little territorial. First he gets up on his front limbs. And
if he gets really agitated with the smaller one in front of him, he’ll do
two things. First, he’ll start bobbing his head up and down to say, “I’m
the biggest dragon in this area, so back off.” And if that doesn’t work, he
actually throws out his throat. It turns black and he puffs it out. It
looks like a big black beard. And that’s where the animal gets his name.

The Bearded Dragon will do that every time an animal is reintroduced into
its area. If he wants to threaten it, he will throw that beard out.
Sometimes in captivity they don’t bother doing it anymore because they’re
so docile by nature and he knows this other dragon, so he’s not really
doing it at this moment.

But two males together, one will dominate the other. He’ll say, “I’m the
biggest dragon here.” If the other one is of equal size and equal
temperament, they will fight. If not, the smaller one actually submits. And
what they do is take their arm and they move it ever so slowly in a counter
clockwise direction and the larger dragon will understand that that’s like
a person saying, “Don’t hit me.” He puts his hands up and says, “I don’t
want to fight.”

So, they work things out together in nature. In nature, of course, they can
disappear and run in different areas. In a captive environment, they have
to have that submissive language going back and forth between them in order
to avoid fights in captivity. The Bearded Dragon, an Australian treasure
for sure.
SHOW MORE
Loading…
Autoplay
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by CasaDeOrtiz Dragons
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by kaldaka87
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by orlandovacationstore
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by Howcast
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by rapatator
161,201 views

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Setting up an Enclosure for Bearded Dragons
by Zamzows Superstore
179,684 views

4:04
Is A Bearded Dragon Right for You? | A Guide to Cost, Supplies, Set-Up,
Care, and Rewards
by delfiend
82,808 views

1:13:02 SHOW MORE
Language: English Country: Worldwide Safety: Off History Help
About Press Copyright Creators Advertise Developers +YouTube
Terms Privacy Policy & Safety Send feedback Try something new!
Up Next 7 Cool Facts about Bearded Dragons | Pet Reptiles
Howcast
Subscribe3,011,382
Add to
Share
More
347,107
1,479 38
Published on Aug 13, 2013
Watch more How to Take Care of Reptiles & Amphibians videos:
http://www.howcast.com/videos/512378-

Learn seven cool facts about bearded dragons from reptile and amphibian
expert Jungle Bob in this Howcast video.

When we think of the continent of Australia, we think of unusual animals
right away, from kangaroos to platypuses to wallabies. They’re all over
there in Australia, it seems. But there are some that are not that unusual,
just fantastic creatures. And one of them is the Pogona Vitticeps, the
Bearded Dragon. There’s a number of different species in Australia, but the
popular one is the dragon you see in front of you here, that has dominated
the pet world now for the last 20 to 25 years.

In their native Australia, they’re inquisitive creatures that easily
inhabit areas where people are. They like to climb fence posts and look out
to see what’s going on. Males will dominate a territory and have multiple
females as mates. And they’re prolific breeders. They have up to 20 eggs at
a time and they dominate the landscape they come from.

They’re quick when they have to be to escape predators. They’re extremely
fast runners. For the most part, they’re kind of sit there and look out and
see what’s going on animals in the wild. They’re very fun and animated to
watch.

They’ll eat a variety of things from insects to greens to small pieces of
meat, such as rodents. Bearded Dragons are largely protected now in their
native Australia. They’re no longer exported, which is very good. Thank
you, Australia, for allowing us to have some of them. But because of their
prolific nature, they are no longer hunted there and they’re free to
multiply and grow in Australia without any danger of being threatened by
the pet trade or by confiscation.

The Bearded Dragon gets his name, as you can see, the big male here is
going to get a little territorial. First he gets up on his front limbs. And
if he gets really agitated with the smaller one in front of him, he’ll do
two things. First, he’ll start bobbing his head up and down to say, “I’m
the biggest dragon in this area, so back off.” And if that doesn’t work, he
actually throws out his throat. It turns black and he puffs it out. It
looks like a big black beard. And that’s where the animal gets his name.

The Bearded Dragon will do that every time an animal is reintroduced into
its area. If he wants to threaten it, he will throw that beard out.
Sometimes in captivity they don’t bother doing it anymore because they’re
so docile by nature and he knows this other dragon, so he’s not really
doing it at this moment.

But two males together, one will dominate the other. He’ll say, “I’m the
biggest dragon here.” If the other one is of equal size and equal
temperament, they will fight. If not, the smaller one actually submits. And
what they do is take their arm and they move it ever so slowly in a counter
clockwise direction and the larger dragon will understand that that’s like
a person saying, “Don’t hit me.” He puts his hands up and says, “I don’t
want to fight.”

So, they work things out together in nature. In nature, of course, they can
disappear and run in different areas. In a captive environment, they have
to have that submissive language going back and forth between them in order
to avoid fights in captivity. The Bearded Dragon, an Australian treasure
for sure.
SHOW MORE
Loading…
Autoplay
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by Howcast
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by SnazzyNikki .
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by Ashley
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by CasaDeOrtiz Dragons
150,874 views

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by kaldaka87
173,973 views

3:02
Happy Bearded Dragon Being Silly
by orlandovacationstore
57,809 views

2:14

52
VIDEOS
How to Take Care of Reptiles & Amphibians
by Howcast
Bearded Dragon Brightens Up Before Your Eyes
by rapatator
161,201 views

5:52
Setting up an Enclosure for Bearded Dragons
by Zamzows Superstore
179,684 views

4:04
Is A Bearded Dragon Right for You? | A Guide to Cost, Supplies, Set-Up,
Care, and Rewards
by delfiend
82,808 views

1:13:02 SHOW MORE
Language: English Country: Worldwide Safety: Off History Help
About Press Copyright Creators Advertise Developers +YouTube
Terms Privacy Policy & Safety Send feedback Try something new!
Up Next 7 Cool Facts about Bearded Dragons | Pet Reptiles
Howcast
Subscribe3,011,382
Add to
Share
More
347,107
1,479 38
Published on Aug 13, 2013
Watch more How to Take Care of Reptiles & Amphibians videos:
http://www.howcast.com/videos/512378-

Learn seven cool facts about bearded dragons from reptile and amphibian
expert Jungle Bob in this Howcast video.

When we think of the continent of Australia, we think of unusual animals
right away, from kangaroos to platypuses to wallabies. They’re all over
there in Australia, it seems. But there are some that are not that unusual,
just fantastic creatures. And one of them is the Pogona Vitticeps, the
Bearded Dragon. There’s a number of different species in Australia, but the
popular one is the dragon you see in front of you here, that has dominated
the pet world now for the last 20 to 25 years.

In their native Australia, they’re inquisitive creatures that easily
inhabit areas where people are. They like to climb fence posts and look out
to see what’s going on. Males will dominate a territory and have multiple
females as mates. And they’re prolific breeders. They have up to 20 eggs at
a time and they dominate the landscape they come from.

They’re quick when they have to be to escape predators. They’re extremely
fast runners. For the most part, they’re kind of sit there and look out and
see what’s going on animals in the wild. They’re very fun and animated to
watch.

They’ll eat a variety of things from insects to greens to small pieces of
meat, such as rodents. Bearded Dragons are largely protected now in their
native Australia. They’re no longer exported, which is very good. Thank
you, Australia, for allowing us to have some of them. But because of their
prolific nature, they are no longer hunted there and they’re free to
multiply and grow in Australia without any danger of being threatened by
the pet trade or by confiscation.

The Bearded Dragon gets his name, as you can see, the big male here is
going to get a little territorial. First he gets up on his front limbs. And
if he gets really agitated with the smaller one in front of him, he’ll do
two things. First, he’ll start bobbing his head up and down to say, “I’m
the biggest dragon in this area, so back off.” And if that doesn’t work, he
actually throws out his throat. It turns black and he puffs it out. It
looks like a big black beard. And that’s where the animal gets his name.

The Bearded Dragon will do that every time an animal is reintroduced into
its area. If he wants to threaten it, he will throw that beard out.
Sometimes in captivity they don’t bother doing it anymore because they’re
so docile by nature and he knows this other dragon, so he’s not really
doing it at this moment.

But two males together, one will dominate the other. He’ll say, “I’m the
biggest dragon here.” If the other one is of equal size and equal
temperament, they will fight. If not, the smaller one actually submits. And
what they do is take their arm and they move it ever so slowly in a counter
clockwise direction and the larger dragon will understand that that’s like
a person saying, “Don’t hit me.” He puts his hands up and says, “I don’t
want to fight.”

So, they work things out together in nature. In nature, of course, they can
disappear and run in different areas. In a captive environment, they have
to have that submissive language going back and forth between them in order
to avoid fights in captivity. The Bearded Dragon, an Australian treasure
for sure.
SHOW MORE
Loading…
Autoplay
Up Next

8 Care Tips for Bearded Dragons | Pet Reptiles
by Howcast
155,538 views

3:02
4 Care Tips for Pixie Frogs | Pet Reptiles
by Howcast
184,795 views

2:05
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by Howcast
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by Howcast
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2:27
Before YOU buy a Bearded Dragon, Watch THIS video!
by Earthling1984
502,756 views

13:01
How To: Take Care Of Bearded Dragon | PansyPan
by Pansy Pan
40,790 views

11:32
Bearded Dragon Husbandry, Proper Caging and Lighting- Carolina Classic
Dragons
by Pogonavision
187,042 views

17:24
Bearded Dragon Laying Eggs & Baby Bearded Dragons
by KB9OKB
133,306 views

10:34
Top 3 Exotic Animals You Can Own As Pets
by Animalist
1,174,240 views

2:52
Bearded dragon Nacho and our kids!
by Jen S
175,592 views

2:52
Bearded Dragon Insanity! Crittacam : AnimalBytesTV
by AnimalBytesTV
66,803 views

5:57
All my 33 pets (updated!)
by SnazzyNikki .
2,873,266 views

16:05
Unboxing My Baby Bearded Dragon
by Ashley
175,460 views

8:54
English bulldog & Bearded Dragon
by CasaDeOrtiz Dragons
150,874 views

1:36
Custom Bearded Dragon Viv
by kaldaka87
173,973 views

3:02
Happy Bearded Dragon Being Silly
by orlandovacationstore
57,809 views

2:14

52
VIDEOS
How to Take Care of Reptiles & Amphibians
by Howcast
Bearded Dragon Brightens Up Before Your Eyes
by rapatator
161,201 views

5:52
Setting up an Enclosure for Bearded Dragons
by Zamzows Superstore
179,684 views

4:04
Is A Bearded Dragon Right for You? | A Guide to Cost, Supplies, Set-Up,
Care, and Rewards
by delfiend
82,808 views

1:13:02 SHOW MORE
Language: English Country: Worldwide Safety: Off History Help
About Press Copyright Creators Advertise Developers +YouTube
Terms Privacy Policy & Safety Send feedback Try something new!
Up Next 7 Cool Facts about Bearded Dragons | Pet Reptiles

mistykittystarburst says:

I’m looking for help we got a baby bearded dragon back in June 16, 2014 and
she got constapated after eating too much and we got so scared cause she
was having like small like attacks that would last like 30 seconds and she
had a bump in her back that the vet said it would go back down, it’s been a
couple months after that and she she now has a curve like the bump went
down wrong. She looks under sized and doesn’t seem to have a problem with
it. We’re waiting to get her to the vet but we don’t have enough money
cause I need surgery.Long story . I was hoping if there was any thing we
can do now to help her.

beautycutie says:

I used to have two of them

Mushroom Plays says:

Hey guys go check out my little beardie named Spike I do videos on him
Thanks :D

Jack TGB says:

I Have A Hypo Sandfire Bearded Dragon Named Touche She’s Only 10 Weeks And
I Love Her :D

Mykenzie M. says:

I love how he touches his beard and it just licks him haha

Chase Tolle says:

0:50 backround… “I want to be on video!!! I want to be on video!!!”

BIG CITY REPTILES says:

Please check out my bearded dragon video

christhefishhunter says:

I can’t look away from the monitor in the background trying to get at the
superworms. He’s like: I WANT SOME TOO!!

King Potatoman's Minecraft Video says:

I Once let my Bearded Dragon (Yoshi the name) out and it ran over to my
slinky and puffed up and bit it lol but never bit me

Fruity Apps Development says:

Hi all, if you like/love beardies, please check out my free iPhone app that
has just been released. Only available on iPhone and iPad
https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/bearded-dragon-app-your-number/id957106306?mt=8


vincent ames says:

What kind of lizard was was behind you

zellcrs says:

The guy in the back wanted some attention and screen time.

MaDRoLLeR says:

Sorry did the lizard in the tank at the back just churp ? 0:52 – 0:54

SKLZ AwesomeSauce says:

If you guys want to watch it I have a time lapse of my baby bearded dragons
in their tank

Gomber 117 says:

the lizard in the back is funny 

tiny pets says:

Bearded Dragons, hands down, are my favorite reptiles!! 

Shimizu95 says:

the Pogona at 0:53 tried to commit suicide

Marc Rosati says:

The lizard in the backround is so funny watch him try to climb the glass
hahaha

Tommy Blair says:

Everything u described about dominance and submission is in fact mating
signs. The male does the black beard. Female waves arms. Both bob head.
Means its mating season. Do some research before u try to drop knowledge
pls. Other than that. Great video.

Michael Palmer says:

The lizard in the background was making some kind of chirping noise, that
made me smile.

Jessica Birtwistle says:

00:48 lol the lizard behind attempts suicide but fails and shouts why!?

Iker Sanchez says:

Tom Syndicate had a Berded Dragon


David Edwards says:

I really need one of these.Realy really really really badly.but i have to
wait five months

Amanda Brown says:

Haha! Smaug the dragon turns into “Black Beard.” 

Your wolfsdengaming says:

2:00 the lizard in the backround yo…….

kitty cam says:

I need help my bearded dragon is hurt and I don’t now why he won’t use his
back feet im realy worried about him

Crumbs HD says:

the lizard in the tank fell fromt he fucking ceiling

Dodgy teabags says:

can i but my male wiv my female then as thay both in 4x2x2 vivs ? and it
make life alot bettter for me move spaace

Matthew Kirkpatrick says:

that lizard in the back is jelos

Jaquilla Starks says:

I did not no

Lautaro Fonseca says:

2.00 Can someone tell me… WHY THE FUCK THAT LIZARD IN THE BACK IS
BREAKDANCING???

sk8terkid4life says:

Great pet to have :)

Paul Ludden says:

One of our dragons hides behind the rocks any time I walk into the house
wearing a ball cap . . . so funny. It must resemble a big bird or some
type of predator because it happens every time without fail. 

Katherine Frost says:

I plan on saving up my money and buying a bearded dragon. Does anyone know
if all of the necessary supplies and dragon itself, will cost less than
$400?

Loved By The Light says:

Bearded Dragons are so cool. I had a bearded dragon for 14 years. 

Stamwell_HD says:

Lol @1:59 Look at the lizard at behind the guy, hes like, “THERES A MAGICAL
BARRIER PREVENTING ME FROM DOING AWESOME PARKOUR!”

Gabe Dezzi says:

Can you feed berdes wax worms


Klifford King says:

The reptile in the cage behind him was so funny the whole video … He
owned the spotlight 

prozombieslayer10 says:

At 1:08 its like he gets scared and raised his voice lol XD

KRYZERO says:

love the music de doo doo de de da doo de de de rum pum pum 

MultiMonster69 says:

Anyone own a bearded know if they can run in their hind legs or not? 

sven oosterdijk says:

GAH SO FREAKING CUUUUTE!!!

Tobirama Senju says:

one of my beardies did that arm thing to me does anybody know why

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